A Weekly Newsletter of Environmental, Ecology, and Sustainability Events at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Table of Contents:

 

 

 

 

Open Seventeen Challenge

The annual Open Seventeen Challenge which tackles the 17 UN SDGs through grassroots participation and citizen science. This interactive online coaching program, with challenges set by UN Environment (UNEP) is a unique opportunity for undergraduates, individually or in teams, to be mentored by international experts and transform their own ideas into impactful projects.

We are looking for talented undergraduates who are interested in participating in this autumn’s challenge on Tackling Plastic Pollution.

Application deadline is 27 October 2019 and participants may be eligible for travel grants to Geneva (Switzerland) to attend international events such the SDG Summer School, as WSIS Forum 2020 and AI for Good.

 

 

 


Halloween Clothing Swap

 

SFI (the Sustainable Fashion Initiative) will be having a Halloween Clothing Swap at 1789 Venture Labs on October 27th at 2pm.

 

 

 


Dept. of Anthropology Colloquium Series

 

Monday, Oct. 21 at 3:35 pm in Alumni 308

 

Research and Engagement in The Savannas of East Africa by Kathleen Galvin – Professor, Dept. of Anthropology and Geography, Colorado State University.

 

Dr. Galvin is a Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Africa Center at CSU. She has conducted interdisciplinary social-ecological systems research in the savannas of East Africa for over 30 years. Galvin has worked with local pastoralists on issues of land use change, conservation, climate change and nutrition. She is a drylands expert and uses frameworks from political ecology and social-ecological systems to understand sustainability and resilience. Her current NASA grant focuses on households, ecosystems, and atmospheric water cycling in East Africa. She is a lead author on the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity

and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and co-author of the American Anthropological Association Task Force Report on Global Climate Change. Dr. Galvin is also one of the recipients of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for contributing to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

 

 

 


DANTA 2019/2020 Field Courses in Tropical Biology

DANTA operates on a cooperative and collaborative teaching model with multiple international instructors on each course. Co-instruction allows for more individualized instruction, and the sharing and appreciation of different ideas. Visiting scholars are often incorporated into the curriculum to broaden student experience.

For more information, please visit our website at www.DANTA.info and/or email conservation@danta.email. For an alumni perspective on our programs, please see our blog DANTAisms – http://dantablog.wordpress.com/.

Methods in Primate Behavior and Conservation

Dates:  Winter Session: December 28, 2019 – January 12, 2020; Summer Session: July 4-July 19, 2020.

Program Fee: $2600

Application deadline: Winter Session: December 1, 2019; Summer Session: June 1, 2020

Course Description

This two week course is designed to provide students with field experience in primate behavior, ecology, and conservation. Learning experiences fall into four main categories: field exercises, seminars, lectures, and applied conservation. The field exercises and seminars provide instruction and experience in: (1) methods of measuring environmental variables, including assessment of resource availability, (2) methods of collecting and analyzing the behavior of free-ranging primates, (3) assessments of biodiversity and (4) techniques for estimating population size. Lecture topics will cover the behavior and ecology of Old and New World primates from an evolutionary perspective. Selected lecture topics include primate sociality, feeding ecology, taxonomy, rain forest ecosystems and conservation. Service learning is a large component of all our programs. Students will gain experience in applied conservation through participation in Osa Conservation’s reforestation, sustainable agriculture and wildlife monitoring programs (big cat and sea turtle).

 
Primate Behavior and Conservation

Dates: June 10 – July 2, 2020

Program Fee: $3500

Application deadline: May 15, 2020

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with field experience in primate behavior, ecology, and conservation. Learning experiences fall into five main categories: field exercises, independent research, discussions, lectures and applied conservation. The first half of the courses is devoted to learning ecological field techniques, while in the second half students design, carry out and present data from their independent research projects. Many of our participants have gone on to present their work at national and regional conferences. The field exercises and seminars provide instruction and experience in:(1) methods of measuring environmental variables, including assessment of resource availability, (2) methods of collecting and analyzing the behavior of free-ranging primates, (3) assessments of biodiversity and (4) techniques for estimating population size. Lecture topics will cover the behavior and ecology of Old and New World primates from an evolutionary perspective. Selected lecture topics include primate sociality, feeding ecology, taxonomy, rain forest ecosystems, conservation, climate change and sustainability. Participants gain experience in applied conservation through participation in Osa Conservation’s reforestation, and sea turtle breeding and monitoring programs.

 

 

Wildlife Conservation and Sustainability

Dates: Winter Session: December 28, 2019 – January 12, 2020; Summer Session: June 10-June 25, 2020

Program fee: $2600

Application deadline: Winter Session: December 1, 2019; Summer Session: May 15, 2020

Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with field experience, on a range of terrestrial surveying techniques, measuring bio-indicator species: mainly key predators and their prey and butterflies. Students will also gain a a better understanding on the principles of defaunation, sustainable development, and community management and its conservation related issues. The course includes four learning experiences categories: field exercises, seminars, lectures, and applied conservation.

 

The field exercises and seminars offer instruction and experience on direct and indirect methods of biodiversity data collection, management, and analysis, as well as GPS navigation and research project development. Direct methods include butterfly trapping while indirect methods comprise mammal tracking, or camera trapping. Lectures cover ecology and socio-economic and anthropogenic impacts related to selected bio-indicator groups in the Neotropics, with a particularly in the Osa Peninsula. Selected lecture topics include ecology, taxonomy, and conservation of medium-large vertebrates and butterflies, as well as effects of anthropogenic impacts on population dynamics or defaunation. Topics on community-based management, participatory methods, and socio-economic effects on both conservation and the development of sustainable livelihoods for local communities are also included. Students also gain experience in community outreach and education through involvement in an activity at the Piro Ranch involving Don Miguel Sanchez, one of the remaining few landowners in the area.

 

Field Excursion

All courses include a visit to a wildlife rehabilitation center, sustainable chocolate plantation and dolphin and snorkeling trip of the Golfo Dulce. We overnight on the Boruca Indigenous Reserve where we will learn about the community and their traditional lifeways, and help with needed projects. Every effort is made to implement eco-friendly and socially responsible practices into our day-to-day operations, field courses and overall mission.

Enrollment in each course is limited to 10 students. The course is open to both credit and non-credit seeking students. University credit can be arranged through your home institution.

 

 

 


Latin American Studies 390 and 690, Spring 2020

 

Experience and document North Carolina’s Mexican and Latin American history through field research, oral history, and service learning. This 3-credit course includes spring break in Ocracoke (March 8- 13, 2020). Travel expenses are provided for students. Apply by October 14, 2019. More info and application here. Contact: Hannah Gill, hgill@email.unc.edu

 

 

 


Undergraduate Research Consultant Teams

 

URCT’s are small “strike teams” in any discipline who have a well-defined research question, outreach need, or design challenge that could be completed in a relatively short time period by an interdisciplinary team of 3-5 undergraduate students guided by a faculty advisor.  The goals of the URCT program are to (1) provide students with opportunities for inquiry and discovery in the context of real-world cutting-edge research, and (2) foster interactions between disciplines (e.g. Humanities and Natural and Social Sciences) that reflect the diversity of perspectives necessary to solve society’s problems. URCT proposals can be generated by faculty members or students. Awards of up to $10,000 per team will be provided to cover the costs of conducting the project (e.g. supplies, travel, etc.) and graduate research assistant support.

 

IF you have an idea for a research project, proposals are due on November 1st for spring semester teams.  If you are a student interested in participating in a URCT please complete the interest form.  If you want to form a team you can search for students by their expertise in the URCT Interest Database.  

 

 


Duke Energy Week 2019

 

It’s time to add Duke Energy Week back to your calendars! After a successful event in 2018, we are back with the Research Poster Presentation 2019. Compared to the last year, the stakes are higher and so will be the reward! Keeping with the theme, Innovation in Energy, research can be from any disciplinary perspective, including technology, policy, finance, data and more. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis until 30th October 2019.

 

First 25 accepted applications will be invited to present their work at the final event to be held at Duke University.

 

Participation is open to students (undergrads, masters, and PhDs welcome!), faculty, and professionals to present their energy-related research at the Duke University Energy Conference on November 6, 2019, at the Fuqua School of Business.

 

Look out for the official guidelines document for the poster presentation soon.

 

SAVE THE DATE! RSVP here!